Top Nature & Wildlife Attractions In India

There is no confusion to the fact that India is known all over the world for its sheer variety of culture, natural and architectural heritage. Since India lies within the Indo-Malaya eco zone it boasts of hosting some wonderful biodiversity. The natural beauty of the country is incomparable to nay other countries of the world. When it comes to wildlife, the tourists will find a rich reserve of wildlife in this country. It has been evident that since the last one or two decades, more and more tourist are opting for India Wildlife Holidays.Gifted with an area of 3,287,590 km², forests and sanctuaries cover more than 18% of the total area. While you plan a trip to this country of diversity, you will be able to see something unique and cherishing.

Those who have known India to be the historical country of some fabulous architectures and natural beauty may have overlooked the fact that this South East Asian country is an ideal hub for the lovers of wildlife. Those who have the taste for adventure and witnessing some endangered species, India will offer them a delightful experience of India Wildlife Holidays. It is a surprising revelation that India is home to 7.6% of all mammalian, 12.6% of all avian, 6.2% of all reptilian, 4.4% of all amphibian, 11.7% of all fish. During your Indian Wildlife Tour, you can surely fulfill your dreams of watching them in their full wilderness. With the growth of India Tourism, tourists are coming in bulk to relish the different shade of the country and explore her untainted wildlife.

Owing to the diverse geographical formations and physical feature, the country has been gifted with an extensive forest reserve. India's forest cover ranges from the tropical rainforest of the Andaman Islands and the Western Ghats, to the coniferous forest of the Himalaya and North-East India. You can look forward to contact any of the major tour operators who will arrange a week long trip to India. Some of the famous national parks of Bandhavgarh (Madhya Pradesh), Corbett National Park (Uttarakhand), Kanha National Park in Madhya Pradesh, Kaziranga National Park in Assam will offer you an adventurous wildlife tour to India. During India Wildlife Holidays, the tourists will have the rare privilege of watching some popular species like, Asiatic lion, the Bengal tiger, and the Indian white-rumped vulture, along with other notable animals.

There are plenty of forest resorts where you can look forward to stay and experience the excitement of staying encompassed by a wild atmosphere around you. If you can spare a week for India Wildlife Holidays, you can assure yourself of spending some of the best days of your life. The tour operators will take you to the popular national parks of Ranthambore in Rajasthan, Sundarbans in West Bengal and some famous sanctuaries. Visiting the Wildlife Sanctuaries like, Hazaribagh National Park of Jharkhand and Ranganthittu Bird Sanctuary in Karnataka is a wonderful experience. Coming to India will remain an incomplete experience unless you venture out on a jeep tour to the forested areas and opt for camping in the protected areas of the forests.

In India there are numerous Wild attractions which you can see, each more beautiful than the other.India harbours some of the richest biodiversity in the world. There are 89 national parks, 13 Bio reserves and 400+ wildlife sanctuaries across India are the best places to go to for a visual treat of tigers, lions, elephants, rhinoceros, birds, and even more which reflect the importance that the country places on nature and wildlife conservation. Out of those thousands, here we list out the top Wild attractions to see in case you are on a short trip to India. Even if you are on a long visit, these are the ones which you must not miss out. Read more about them...

National Parks in India

1Bandhavgarh National Park

Set among the Vindhya hills of Madhya Pradesh Bandhavgarh National Park contains a wide variety of habitats and a high density of game, including a large number of Tigers. This is also the White tiger country. These have been found in the old state of Rewa for Many years. Maharaja Martand Singh captured the last known in 1951. This white Tiger, Mohan is now stuffed and on display in the Palace of Maharaja of Rewa. Prior to becoming a National Park, the forests around Bandavgarh had long been maintained as a Shikargah, or game preserve of the Maharaja of Rewa. The Maharaja and his guests carried out hunting - otherwise the wildlife was well protected. It was considered a good omen for Maharaja of Rewa to shoot 109 tigers. His Highness Maharaja Venkat Raman Singh shot 111 Tigers by 1914.

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2Bandipur National Park

Spread in a vast area, encompassing 874 square kilometers, Bandipur National Park is a great example of Project Tiger’s conservation efforts. This tiger reserve was utilized as a private hunting reserve by the Maharaja of Mysore in the earlier times. Along with Nagarhole National Park, Mudumalai National Park and Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary; it forms a part of the highly renowned Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve.This whole reserve has earned acclaim due to its reputation as Southern India’s largest preserved area. A great example of Eco- conservation, the serene Bandipur National Park is situated along Karnataka’s Mysore-Ooty highway. The year 1973 heralded establishment of the beautiful Bandipur Tiger Reserve. Exquisitely managed, numerous biomes consisting of moist deciduous forests, dry deciduous forests and shrub lands flourish in the park. Home to a perfect tropical climate, its beauty is enhanced on account of the presence of many rivers. The northern end is witness to the Kabini River and the Moyar flows through the south of the park. In addition, the enchanting Nugu River flows through it. Many endangered and vulnerable species have garnered refuge here. Stringent efforts followed regarding conservation are extremely helpful in keeping the future of various species secure. A majestic sight awaits wildlife enthusiasts when they witness mighty elephants strolling in the park or the elusive tiger hunting its prey.

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3Royal Bardia National Park India

Spread in a vast area, encompassing 874 square kilometers, Bandipur National Park is a great example of Project Tiger’s conservation efforts. This tiger reserve was utilized as a private hunting reserve by the Maharaja of Mysore in the earlier times. Along with Nagarhole National Park, Mudumalai National Park and Wayanad Wildlife Sanctuary; it forms a part of the highly renowned Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve.This whole reserve has earned acclaim due to its reputation as Southern India’s largest preserved area. A great example of Eco- conservation, the serene Bandipur National Park is situated along Karnataka’s Mysore-Ooty highway. The year 1973 heralded establishment of the beautiful Bandipur Tiger Reserve. Exquisitely managed, numerous biomes consisting of moist deciduous forests, dry deciduous forests and shrub lands flourish in the park. Home to a perfect tropical climate, its beauty is enhanced on account of the presence of many rivers. The northern end is witness to the Kabini River and the Moyar flows through the south of the park. In addition, the enchanting Nugu River flows through it. Many endangered and vulnerable species have garnered refuge here. Stringent efforts followed regarding conservation are extremely helpful in keeping the future of various species secure. A majestic sight awaits wildlife enthusiasts when they witness mighty elephants strolling in the park or the elusive tiger hunting its prey.

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4Dudhwa National Park

Situated in the foot hills of Himalayas in the terai region, the Dudhwa National Park, which is also a Tiger Reserve, is a relatively new entrant in Project Tiger. Dudhwa’s terai vegetation comprises of savannah grasslands interspersed with forests consisting of trees such as Jamun, Shisam, Silk Cotton tree, Khair etc.

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5Hemis National Park

Hemis National Park, itself advise a altitude with the park. Yes, the Hemis Thin Air National park in Ladakh in the state Jammu and Kashmir is located at an altitude varying between 3,300 and 6,000 m above the sea level. It is the largest national park in a north of Himalayas which consists of catchments of the lower Zanskar River, from it’s confluence using the Markha river to the conference with the Indus. It is named after Buddhist monastery, the Hemis Gompa expands over 4,Hundred sq km in the trans Himalayan place of Ladakh. It is an wonderful treasure chest to the wild life lovers. Your land scape of snow caped mountain tops alongside with a number of varieties of endangered mammals such as the Snow Leopard Hemis High Altitude National Park is actually an ideal spot for dream holidays.

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6Jim Corbett National Park

The first National Park and Tiger Reserve of India, Corbett National Park in Uttaranchal offers visitors great opportunity to spot wild animals and birds. Spotting tigers, however, requires bit of patience since the king of best doesn't gives frequent appearance.

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7Kanha National Park

Situated in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, the picturesque Kanha National Park was the inspiration behind Rudyard Kipling's unforgettable classic Jungle Book .Over 1,940 sq km of bamboo thickets, extensive grasslands and dense sal forests make up Kanha- a series of plateaus which stretch across the eastern segment of the Satpura ranges in Madhya Pradesh.

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8Kaziranga National Park

The Kaziranga National Park in the Jorhat district of Assam is just the place if you wish to see the one horned rhino. The park also houses a healthy population of tiger, wild buffalos and elephants. Rare species of birds like hornbill are also a major drawer of tourists.

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9Manas National Park

A biodiversity hotspot, Manas National Park is famed for its endangered endemic wildlife; with the main attraction being the one-horned rhinoceros. This scenic sanctuary has earned the status of a UNESCO Natural World Heritage Site. A famed Project Tiger Reserve, its lies alongside the majestic Manas River. Exceptionally important, Manas is situated in North-East India’s Assam and shares a northern international border with the kingdom of Bhutan. Being flanked on the northern end by the imposing Bhutan hills and presence of serene grasslands present a spectacular wilderness experience.Manas River, along with influencing the park’s name also serves as an international border between the sovereign states of India and Bhutan. The tumultuous river, rushing through the park’s western end, joins the legendary Brahmaputra downstream. Awarded with several international and national designations, Manas national park is offered the highest legal protection under various provisions of Indian Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972. A lot of renowned conservation organizations support the park in maintaining an efficient work procedure. Witnessing the royal tiger and the elusive rhinoceros in the environs sends a chill down the spine along with creating a mystical ambience.

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10Namdapha National Park

Namdapha Tiger reserve in Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh is spread in an area of 1,850-sq-kms rugged terrain. Perhaps no other national park in the world has a wider attitudinal variation than the Namdapha national park that rises from 200m to 4,500m in the snow-capped mountain. This variation has given rise to the growth of diverse habitats of flora and fauna. For the truly dedicated wilderness and wildlife fan, a visit to the Namdapha National Park is a challenging one. It is also an ideal place for trekking and hiking The beautiful forests possess great bio diversity of Flora and Fauna. A detailed study of its species and genetic variation has not yet been thoroughly done. Namdapha is a Botanist's dream and it may take as long as 50 years to complete a comprehensive survey of its botanical resources. There are more than 150 timber species. The Pinus Merkusi and Abies Delavavi are not found any where else in India than here. One of the rarest and endangered orchids, the Blue Vanda is also found here. The most famous local medicinal plant Mishimi Teeta, which is used by the local tribals to cure all kinds of diseases, is available here.

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11Nameri National Park

Nameri National Park is located in the foothills of the Eastern Himalaya in the Sonitpur District of Assam, India. It is one of the richest and most threatened reservoirs of plant and animal life in the world. The Pakhui (Pakke) Sanctuary of Arunachal Pradesh adjoins the Park on its Northeastern side. The Park extends up to east and south west bank of the river Bor Dikorai from interstate boundary at Sijussa to the left bank of Jia Bharali River up to the south bank of Balipara Reserve Forest. The area is drained by the Jia Bharali and its tributaries namely the Diji, Dinai, Doigurung, Nameri, Dikorai, Khari etc. The Park covers an area of 200 sq. km. and is augmented by parts of the Balipara Reserve Forests Area, which acts as a 64 sq. km. buffer on the opposite side of the Jia Bharali and 80 sq. kms. of the Nauduar Reserve Forests. The terrain is uneven with altitudes ranging from 80 meters along the river banks to 225 meters in the central and northern parts.

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12Pin Valley National Park

Abode of various endangered species Pin Vally National Park is put in the tough terrain of Himachal Pradesh. This beautiful park is the only national park nestled in the cold desert area of Spiti region and was established around 1987. The core zone of the park addressing an area of 675 sq km and 1150 as buffer zone. In the outside of the park there are regarding 17 villages situated with a total population of about 1600 villagers. Together with these there are 17 Dogharies with some cultivation inside the park. These Dogharies are used as summer residences by the local shop who are consists of planned tribes of Buddhist local community.

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13Rajaji National Park India

A somewhere warm with regard to nature lover’s Rajaji Nationwide Park India is situated in the state Uttaranchal. It’s an amalgamation of three sanctuaries- Rajaji, Motichur and Chilla sanctuary spans over a place of 820sq. Famous for its pristine scenic beauty Rajaji is situated along the foothills of Himalaya down the hills regarding Shiwalik ranges and signify the biggest area of Shiwalik eco-system. The imperial Ganges flows through the area with the park for a distance of 24 km, with countless streams and streams making it rich and diverse. Your engaging landscape of and wild life of Rajaji provide ample possibilities to the dynamics lovers.

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16Ranthambore National Park

One of Rajasthan's premier wildlife sanctaury, Ranthambore National Park is well known for its Tiger and also variety of floral variety. The Ranthambore Fort stands impressively in the park.

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17Sultanpur National Park India

Sultanpur, Fouthy-six kms to the south-west of Delhi, is a natural getaway having a lake and wildlife. Sultanpur was declared a water-bird reserve in 1972 and its reasons are lush together with lawns and trees and shrubs and public of bougainvillea. It is advised to spend some time in the small museum and library in the reserve, as you receives a fair concept of the birds and creatures you’ll probably see on your visit to the arrange. A good pair of binoculars is a must to clearly notice the wildlife from the safe distance, without distressing them.

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18Sundarbans National Park

The vast swampy delta of these two great Indian rivers, Brahamaputra and the actual Ganges extends over areas including of mangrove forests, swamps and forest island all interwoven in a network of small rivers and streams. The Sundarbans National Park India, home of the Royal Bengal Tiger, covering an area of around 1330.10-sq-kms and the largest mangrove forest in the world, form the core of this area. The Sundarban region has got its name from Sundari trees, once found in large quantity here. The Ganges and the actual Brahmaputra form this alluvial archipelago involving 54 islands watered by the Bay of Bengal. The islands Goasaba, Sandeshkali and Basanti form the northern boundary of the actual Sundarbans; on the south is the sea; to the west side of the Sunderbans park is the Matla and Bidya Rivers and to the east is the international boundary of Bangladesh.

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19Gir National Park

The last natural habitat of the Asiatic Lions, Gir National Park in Gujarat makes for an interesting visit. Apart from the Lions, the park is also home to 300 species of birds.

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20Annamalai National Park

Annamalai wildlife sanctuary is one of the most attractive preserves of nature in Tamil Nadu, is also known as the India Gandhi National Park and is located in the Western Ghats. There are many places of natural and scenic beauty in the Annamalai wildlife sanctuary. Some of them are Grass hills, Karianshola, Anaikunthi Shola, groves, waterfalls, teak forests, reservoirs and dams. Nilgiri Langur, Liontailed macaque Gaur, Elephant, Chital, Sambar, Mouse Deer, Barking Deer, Variety of Birds, Tiger, panther, Wild Dog, Nilgiri Tahr.The park is rich in mixed deciduous forest with fair population of rosewood and teaks.

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21Nagarhole National Park

Nagarhole National Park, the enchanting 247 square-mile park in Karnataka has an astonishing abundance of wildlife including large mammals such as tiger, leopard, wild elephant, Dhole (Indian wild dog), and Gaur (Indian bison).The park derives its name from the combination of two Kannada words. 'Naga,' meaning snake, and 'hole,' meaning streams. True to its name, quite a few serpentine streams fork through the rich tropical forests of the park. The landscape is one of gentle slopes and shallow valleys. Dry deciduous forest trees are leafless in the summer rather than in the winter. There are grassy swamps where the soil is clayey, perennially moist, and which support a luxuriant growth of green grass all year. The change in terrain throughout the park in refreshing and the river system provides a unique wildlife viewing experience. The park has been recently renamed as Rajiv Gandhi National Park after the late Prime Minister of India.

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22 Panna National Park

Panna National Park is situated in the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh, at a distance of around 57 km from Khajuraho. The region, famous for its diamond industry, is also home to some of the best wildlife species in India and is one of the most famous Tiger Reserves in the country. The park is known worldwide for its wild cats, including tigers as well as deer and antelope. Due to its closeness to one of the best-known Indian tourist attraction in India, Khajuraho, the park is recognized as an exciting stop-over destination.

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23Pench National Park

Pench National Park falls under the Seoni and Chhindwara districts of Madhya Pradesh. It derives its name from the Pench River that flows through its heart and divides it into two, equal western and eastern halves - Chhindwara and Seoni respectively. The park is known for its population of the fearless master predator. Most of the tourists come to visit the place, hoping to catch a glimpse of the Tiger. Pench offers its visitors numerous wildlife attractions which include over 39 species of mammals, 13 species of reptiles, 3 species of amphibians and more than 210 varieties of birds.

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24Eravikulam National Park

A sanctuary for the endangered mountain goat of South India, the Nilgiri Tahr (Hemitragus hylocrious), the Eravikulam National Park stands out for the stark beauty of its rolling grasslands and sholas, spread over 97 sq km in the Rajamalai hills. Anamudi, the highest peak (2695 m) south of the Himalayas, towers over the sanctuary in majestic pride. The slopes of the hills abound in all kinds of rare flora and fauna. The Atlas moth, the largest of its kind in the world, is a unique inhabitant of the park. Other rare species of fauna found here are the Nilgiri Langur, the lion-tailed macaque, leopards, tigers, etc.

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25Velavadar National Park

Blackbuck National Park Velavadar, in the Bhal region of Saurashtra is a unique grassland ecosystem that has attracted fame for the successful conservation of the blackbuck, the wold and the lesser florican. Once found in open plains throughout the country and the state of Gujarat, its largest population at present occurs in Velavadar National Park. This exclusively Indian animal is perhaps the most graceful and beautiful of its kind. It has ringed horns that have a spiral twist of three to fours turns and are up to 70 cm long. The body's upper parts are black and the under parts and a ring around the eyes are white. The light brown female is usually hornless. There are two gates with a road in between which leads to the park. The reception attached to the Kaliyarbhavan Forest Lodge is the place where the visitors pay the entry fee to the park. The park interpretation centre located at a short distance from here provides basic information about the animals and birds found in the area.

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26Great Himalayan National Park

Established in 1984, the Great Himalayan National Park rolls out some breathtaking natural beauty. This factor, coupled with its significant biological diversity has helped it in attaining the status of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Sprawled over 754.4 km2, this lush region displays snowy peaks while sitting in the lap of the gorgeous Himalayas. Mystical glaciers and unique ecological conditions of the Western Himalayas were salient features responsible for the park’s establishment in Himachal Pradesh’s Kullu district.

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Wildlife Sanctuaries In India

1Dibru Saikhowa Wildlife Sanctuary

Dibru Saikhowa National Park is one of the 19 (nineteen) biodiversity hotspots in the world. It mainly consists of semi wet evergreen forests, tropical moist deciduous forest, bamboo, cane brakes and grasslands. Situated in the flood plains of Brahmaputra, at an altitude of 118 m above sea level, Dibru-Saikhowa is a safe haven for many extremely rare and endangered species of wildlife, including over 300 species of avifauna both endangered and migratory, as well as various species of shrubs, herbs and rare medicinal plants.

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2Periyar Wildlife Sanctuary

The most famous sanctaury of Kerala, Periyar is where the large herds of elephants, over 300 species of birds and around 120 species of butterflies greet visitors. The park also has a tiger population which you can look out for during your trip.

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3Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve

Situated in Maharashtra’s Chandrapur district, Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve has earned the distinction as the jewel in the state’s crown. Maharashtra’s largest national park is a treasure trove of threatened species and plays an important role as a functionary of Project Tiger. The name Tadoba is bestowed by the God ‘Tadoba’ or ‘Taru’ who as per legends, used to be the village chief of the local tribals. A mythological encounter with a tiger describes the inherent ferocity and heroism of the God Taru. A temple built for Taru, on Tadoba Lake’s banks, is thronged by the devout Adivasis. ‘Andhari’ comes from the mesmerizing Andhari River flowing through the dense forests.The reserve sprawls over an area of 625.4 square kilometers. Dense jungles and heavily forested hills ranging 200 m to 350m make up its scenic northern and western boundaries. Wetland areas in the reserve include the Tadoba Lake, Kolsa Lake and Andhari River. Tadoba Lake is famed on account of its population of Mugger crocodiles. Predominant tree species in these forests are teak. Smooth meadows and beautiful valleys are also witnessed within this diverse landscape. Animals garner refuge in the various cliffs and caves spread throughout the region. Visiting several wildlife species in their natural surroundings offers lifetime memories. The reserve has excelled in the herculean task of offering security to endangered flora and fauna.

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4Sariska Wildlife Sanctuary

Sariska National Park lies in the Aravalli hills and is the former hunting preserve of the Maharaja of Alwar. Sariska itself is a wide valley with two large plateaus and is dotted with places of historical and religious interest, including the ruins of the Kankwari Fort, the 10th century Neelkanth temples, the Budha Hanumab Temple near Pandupol, the Bharthari Temple near the park office, and the hot and cold springs of Taalvriksh. The large Siliserh Lake is at the north-eastern corner. The forests are dry deciduous, with trees of Dhak, Acacia, Ber and Salar. The Tigers of Sariska are largely nocturnal and are not as easily seen as those of Ranthambhor. The park also has good populations of Nilgai, Sambar and Chital. In the evenings, Indian Porcupine, Striped Hyaena, Indian Palm Civet and even Leopard are sometimes seen. The forests are lush during and immediately following the monsoon, but during the dry months of February May there is a shortage of water and in consequence mammals are attracted to water holes. At this time of year visibility is good because of the sparse foliage. Sariska is excellent for birdwatching and has an unusually large population of Indian Peafowl.

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5National Chambal Sanctuary

The rare gangetic dolphin is the main attraction of National Chambal Sanctuary. The other inhabitants of this sanctuary are magar (crocodile) and gharial (alligator), chinkara, sambar, nilgai, wolf and wild boar. Founded in 1979 the sanctuary is a part of a large area co-administered by Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttar Pradesh. The endangered Gharial finds a home in the National Chambal Sanctuary in UP, with its friend, the Ganges River Dolphin. The National Chambal Sanctuary in UP is a natural reservoir for the marsh crocodiles, swimming eagerly and often prying for prey, at shore while basing in the sun. Stretching for 400 kilometers, the transparent lake of National Chambal Sanctuary in UP also houses the Smooth Coated Otters. These are fresh water carnivores with webbed and clawed feet and thick brown fur. To protect the animals from the harmful effects of modern civilization and their subsequent replenishment, the National Chambal Sanctuary was set up in Uttar Pradesh.

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6Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary

One of the finest bird parks in the world, Bharatpur Bird Sanctuary also known as Keoladeo Ghana National Park is a reserve that offers protection to faunal species as well. Keoladeo, the name derives from an ancient Hindu temple, devoted to Lord Shiva, which stands at the centre of the park. 'Ghana' means dense, referring to the thick forest, which used to cover the area. Nesting indigenous water- birds as well as migratory water birds and waterside birds, this sanctuary is also inhabited by Sambar, Chital, Nilgai and Boar.

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7Wayanad Wildlife

Wayanad is most prettiest part of their state. Encompassing part of a remote forest reserve that spills into Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, Wayanad’s landscape combines epic mountain scenery, rice paddies of ludicrous green, skinny betel nut trees, bamboo, red earth, spiky ginger fields, and rubber, cardamom and coffee plantations. Foreign travellers are making it here in increasing numbers, partly because it provides easy access between Mysore or Bangalore and Kerala, but it’s still fantastically unspoilt and satisfyingly remote. Importantly, it's also one of the few places you’re almost guaranteed to spot wild elephants.

8Thattekad Bird Sanctuary

Thattekad Bird Sanctuary, popularly known as Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary, is situated at the foot of Western Ghats. The sanctuary expands over a staggering 25 km on the North side of Periyar River. The forest was raised to its current status of a sanctuary in the year 1983, as this was done in line on the recommendation of Dr. Salim Ali. Hence, the sanctuary was named after Dr. Salim Ali, as Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary. Dr. Ali used to be a scientist and ornithologist at this place. In his report on the avifauna life in the region, he described this place as the richest bird habitat in peninsular India. Later after that report in 1930, most parts of the forest diverted to be used for the planned cultivation and Teak and Mahogany Plantation. Whatever is left in the forest is now a preserved bird sanctuary, which is phenomenally the biggest bio diverse habitat in Kerala. Salim Ali Bird Sanctuary is now home to a large number of resident and migratory birds.

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More great destinations can be found in the Explore India page.

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